Ohio Supreme Court reinstates law license of Boardman attorney - WFMJ.com News weather sports for Youngstown-Warren Ohio

Ohio Supreme Court reinstates law license of Boardman attorney

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Martin Yavorcik Martin Yavorcik
COLUMBUS, Ohio -

The Ohio Supreme Court has reinstated the law license of a Boardman attorney whose conviction in the Oakhill corruption case was overturned.

The justices issued an order this week granting Martin Yavorcik's Motion for Reinstatement.

The decision comes after the state supreme court refused to review an appeals court decision reversing Yavorcik's 2016 conviction and sentence on charges of engaging in a pattern of corrupt activity, conspiracy, bribery, tampering with records, and money laundering.

Yavorcik argued successfully that prosecutors failed to establish why the case against him was filed in Cuyahoga County instead of Mahoning County.

Yavorcik, along with former Youngstown's mayor John McNally and former Mahoning County Auditor Mike Sciortino were charged in connection with an alleged scheme to stop the Mahoning County from moving government offices out of rental space leased from the Cafaro Company.

McNally was put on probation for one year after pleading guilty two counts of falsification and one count each of unlawful use of a telecommunications device and attempted unlawful disclosure of government information.

Sciortino pleaded guilty to having an unlawful interest in a public contract as well as two misdemeanor counts of falsification and receiving or soliciting improper compensation.

Yavorcik told the court he had completed the 29 hours of continuing law education credits required for reinstatement.

The justices noted that the reinstatement won't terminate any pending disciplinary proceedings against Yavorcik.

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